What parameters can be included with an event hit for reporting?

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What parameters can be included with an event hit for reporting? When a visitor comes to your web page, they may have any number of interactions. The most common interaction is clicking on a link that takes them to another web page. For many website owners, this is not enough information. Knowing which links were clicked and what pages the visitors went to gives much more insight into their experience with your site. This blog post will discuss how you can use data from event hits in Google Analytics to understand what your customers are doing when they visit your site!

 which parameters can be included with an event hit for reporting?

The data in a Google Analytics Events report is displayed as rows, and each row represents one event. You may have noticed that some of the columns are labeled Parameter or Value. These values represent what we call “parameters” – information about the visitor’s interaction with content on your site. Some examples of these parameters include:

Visit Duration (seconds) = The time elapsed between when this visit started and when it ended.

Page Title= The title of the page that was visited by this person before they triggered this particular event; e.g., if someone clicks on a link to another page, but never triggers any events from visiting other pages, then this page title will represent the name of that second page.

The following parameters can be included with an event hit for reporting:

Event Label Type=”Value” = What type of value(s)- as a parameter.

URL Segment=”Value” = The segment of the URI which this event was triggered.

The following parameters are available in Google Analytics’ Event Tracking interface:

Category = What category or type of visitor is represented by this event; e.g., ‘purchase’, ‘view content’. This parameter can be left blank for no specific categorization purposes.

Action = What action took place which generated an event; e.g., ‘Click’, ‘Visit’.

Label = The label which will be used to identify this event. This parameter can not contain a value, and cannot duplicate the category or action of the same name.

Value = Any other additional Data which is available in Google Analytics’ Event Tracking interface; e.g., Page URL, Country Code, City Name. These values are limited by case sensitivity for letters A – Z only.”

What parameters can be included with an event hit for reporting? Parameters that can be reported on include: Events Labels Type=”Value” (e.g., “PageView”), Category=”Value”, Action= “value”, Label=”Value”. There may also be specific data from different settings within Google Analytics, which will vary depending on the account.

There are many variables to keep in mind when setting up events. In order to track events properly, the data being reported on should be included in at least one parameter of an event hit for reporting.

For example, to track a video play event for YouTube channel ABCDEFG Videos, you would need at least one of these parameters to report on: Event Type = Play Video Event Label = Playing video

Youtube Channel Name OR – Title Of The Video Being Played OR – URL To Which The Player Is Linked

The Parameters available in Google Analytics’ Event Tracking interface; e.g., Page URL, Page Title, etc., additional parameters may also be required based on which event is being tracked.

 Event Name (Required)

Event Label (required if there’s more than one label for the same event type) – This should include a clear and concise description of what happened in your website or app that triggered this particular hit. For example: The user clicked ‘Play’. It would not make sense to use generic labels like “Clicked” because it doesn’t tell us anything about the specific task performed by the visitor who generated this report data.

Action Type (Required if applicable) – What did they do? Did they click? Scroll down a page? Repeat an action in succession too many times? Specifying actions will help you understand what your users are doing on your site.

Label (Required if applicable) – What did they do? Did they click a button or scroll down the page to read more content? Specifying actions will help you understand which tasks visitors performed most often in order to get insights into their behavior and motivations.

 Value

Conversion Event Name (required for events that triggered conversion data reports when redirecting from an acquisition campaign) – This is different than event label, which should be short and descriptive of the thing happening onsite such as “Play” while this should include details about how a visitor became a customer. For example: A visitor converted by purchasing something after visiting your homepage for at least five seconds without scrolling

In this post, we’ll cover the following: What did they do? Did they click a button or scroll down the page to read more content? Specifying actions will help you understand which tasks visitors performed most often in order to get insights into their behavior and motivations. For example: A visitor converted by purchasing something after visiting your homepage for at least five seconds without scrolling would have a label “Converted” and value of “Yes” while another one that clicked on category links from the sidebar might have two labels “Clicked Category Links” and “Scrolls Down Page.”

The following parameters can be included with an event hit for reporting:

which parameters can be included with an event hit for reporting?

What did they do?: What actions were completed by a visitor on the site after clicking the “Continue Reading” button or scrolling down past more than five lines of content without clicking anything else? Did they click a button or scroll down the page to read more content? Specifying actions will help you understand which tasks visitors are completing on your site.

Event: Clicked Category Links, Scrolls Down Page – This parameter is not just referring to events that occur when a user clicks links from subcategories in the sidebar but also when one scrolls down beyond approximately five seconds past any link where there was no other interaction before this point (i.e., when a user scrolls down the page for more than five seconds to read additional content).

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